Category: UK Population (7)

The FT reports on how London’s economic geography has changed in the 21st century. The inner city has developed rapidly. Its core is growing faster than its periphery. Immigration from around the world is part of this story, but so too is the influx of younger people of childbearing age, attracted to the lifestyles of gentrified inner areas such as Hackney and Lambeth and their improving schools. There has been a new, diverse baby boom in the capital. And unusually, the past 10 years have seen more people arrive in inner London from the rest of England and Wales than leave.

Click link to go story on FT.com

The Guardian is running a story on London’s magnetic pull for young people all over the UK, illustrated by the statistic that one in three 22-30 year olds leaving their UK hometowns end up in London. Click image to go to the story.

Net flows of people to London. Click image to go to Guardian story

Net flows of people to London. Click image to go to Guardian story

The Economist reports that LONDON is turning inside out. That, anyway, is roughly the argument of a couple of pieces they published recently. Just as affluent young professionals seem to be staying in the inner-city longer, turning places such as Dalston (in Hackney) and Peckham (in Southwark) into hipster enclaves, so too are the outer suburbs getting poorer, as people who cannot afford inner-London rents are pushed further out.

Click the image to read more:

Click image to go to story

Click image to go to story

The Evening Standard reports that the majority of the capital’s population now lives east of Blackfriars Bridge. This remarkable demographic shift to just beyond the Square Mile’s ancient walls is largely due to new transport links — the Jubilee line and the East London line extensions among them — that have combined with riverbank regeneration to revitalise City fringe districts, now bursting with dot.commerce businesses and new cultural and leisure attractions.

Truman Brewery Brick Lane

Truman Brewery Brick Lane

The New York Times today reports on the 300,000 Parisians who have moved across the Channel to Paris-on-Thames, aka London. They come in search of jobs and the global swirl: that raucous mix of innovation and grunge missing in a too-perfect Paris.

A new lycée, a new radio station (French Radio London) and a new electoral constituency all testify to the exodus, as did the appearance in London last week of the French Socialist candidate François Hollande.

More than 300,000 French now live in London, making it the sixth-largest French city. Most are under 40. They learn English and they learn that globalization is not merely the catalogue of woes so laboriously laid out by the French left over the past couple of decades.

Click to go to NYT story by Roger Cohen

Click to go to NYT story by Roger Cohen

Britain will become the most populous country in the European Union within a generation, thanks to the fastest population growth since the baby boom.

By 2043, the population will have swollen to more than 74 million, outstripping France and Germany.

Two thirds of the expansion will be due to immigration, according to the Office for National Statistics.

The landmark figure of 70 million could be reached in 16 years after officials yesterday revised upward population projections.

Over the next decade, the population will increase by the equivalent of a city the size of Leeds every year. Officials estimate the population will swell by 0.8 per cent – or 491,000 – every year to 2020, the fastest sustained growth since the 1960s.

The ONS now predicts the UK will have 70 million people by 2027, compared with 2029 at the last estimate. The population is currently around 62 million.

Crucially, if the trend continues, it will overtake Germany for the first time as the largest EU country by 2043.

It would mean the UK will be the biggest country in Europe outside Russia.

Portobello Road - Always Packed!

Portobello Road - Always Packed!