Category: Transport & Infrastructure (26)

The FT reports on how London’s economic geography has changed in the 21st century. The inner city has developed rapidly. Its core is growing faster than its periphery. Immigration from around the world is part of this story, but so too is the influx of younger people of childbearing age, attracted to the lifestyles of gentrified inner areas such as Hackney and Lambeth and their improving schools. There has been a new, diverse baby boom in the capital. And unusually, the past 10 years have seen more people arrive in inner London from the rest of England and Wales than leave.

Click link to go story on FT.com

Interesting video from CBRE looking at new research on the effect Crossrail will have on house prices in London.

Click image to go to video:

Click image to view video

Click image to view video

Homeowners with the good fortune of having planted themselves along the Central, Piccadilly, Victoria or Jubilee lines or relevant sections of the Northern line can expect an effect on house prices and rents following news that these lines will shortly be operating right through the night. Click the image below to see the Night Tube Map

Click image to see night tube map

Click image to see night tube map

Consultancy Jones Lang LaSalle have been looking at the effect on house prices of London’s massive Crossrail project, and are predicting price rises in some neighbourhoods of as much as 44% by 2018. The east-west rail link through the capital, and Europe’s largest infrastructure project, will cause more property ripples, and have a bigger impact on London, than even the latest Tube extensions to the Jubilee and East London lines.

Click to go to Evening Standard story

Click to go to Evening Standard story

Today the London Independent has published photos of progress at Crossrail. The £14.8bn project, slated for completion in 2018, will connect Maidenhead and Heathrow in the west to Shenfield and Abbey Wood in the east.

The developers claim it will increase London’s rail capacity by 10 per cent.

The pictures show the five tunnelling machines carving new paths under the capital, and remodelling old ones, some of which were first used in 1878.

Over 7,000 people are working on the dig, which goes on 24 hours a day. Click image for more.

Click to view Crossrail image gallery from The Independent

Click to view Crossrail image gallery from The Independent

Boris Bikes not strenuous enough? Proposal by Y/N Studio would transform canals into a swimmable network, from Little Venice to Limehouse via Broadway Market. Click image below to go to the story.

Londons proposed Lido Line at Broadway Market

London's proposed 'Lido Line' at Broadway Market

A new report has been published on the predicted effect Crossrail will have on London property prices. The headline is that “Residential capital values are projected to increase immediately around Crossrail stations in central London by 25 per cent, and by 20 per cent in the suburbs, again above a rising baseline projection. In many locations, Crossrail will have a transformative effect on the property market and development activity over time.”

Crossrail is among the most significant infrastructure projects ever undertaken in the UK. From improving journey times across London, to easing congestion and offering better connections, Crossrail will change the way people travel around the capital. Crossrail’s new stations will revitalise the concept of the station being the centre of the community it serves.

Click image to go to the story.

Click image to go to story

Click image to go to story

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park will be a new area of east London for communities to grow and develop. There will be five new neighbourhoods built on the Park and up to 8,000 new homes; Chobham Manor will be the first neighbourhood to be developed, located between the Lee Valley VeloPark and the Athletes’ Village in the north-east of the Park. It will be centred around 800 new homes and 3,000 sq m of community and ancillary facilities, including a polyclinic, two nurseries and a community centre.

The four other neighbourhoods are: East Wick which will be in the north-west of the Park, next to Hackney Wick; Sweetwater near the Old Ford area, in the south-west of the Park; Marshgate Wharf will be between Stratford City and the Stadium, to the south-east of the Stadium; and Pudding Mill will be the area in and around Pudding Mill Lane station.

Click image to launch 360 tour

Click image to launch 360 tour

The New York Times reports today on the effect the Olympic Park will have on London:

The London Games, although lacking in geopolitical oomph, do have a big-ticket project: The Olympic Park in Stratford, a massive, multibillion exercise in urban renewal that will, at least for 17 days in July and August, shift London’s traditionally west-leaning axis to the east as tourists and Londoners alike disembark from tube and train among other transport options…

Read more – click the image