Category: London culture (11)

The FT reports on how London’s economic geography has changed in the 21st century. The inner city has developed rapidly. Its core is growing faster than its periphery. Immigration from around the world is part of this story, but so too is the influx of younger people of childbearing age, attracted to the lifestyles of gentrified inner areas such as Hackney and Lambeth and their improving schools. There has been a new, diverse baby boom in the capital. And unusually, the past 10 years have seen more people arrive in inner London from the rest of England and Wales than leave.

Click link to go story on FT.com

The Guardian is running a story on London’s magnetic pull for young people all over the UK, illustrated by the statistic that one in three 22-30 year olds leaving their UK hometowns end up in London. Click image to go to the story.

Net flows of people to London. Click image to go to Guardian story

Net flows of people to London. Click image to go to Guardian story

The Hackney Fashion Hub is a major regeneration project on the edge of Hackney Central town centre that will create a new focal point for UK fashion in the heart of London’s East End. The project is being pushed along by Harry Handelsman the brains and brawn behind the restoration of St Pancras.

Kudos for Hackney if this project gets the nod.

http://hackneyfashionhub.co.uk/

With property prices soaring, more and more people are stuck in rented houses when they would rather own, but according to a feature in The Guardian a bit of creativity can help to turn your rental into a home…

Click to go to story on Guardian.co.uk

Click to go to story on Guardian.co.uk

The acclaimed chef of Bethnal Green’s Viajante (1 Michelin Star), Nuno Mendes gives a tour of his favourite destinations on Broadway Market. Included in Nuno’s guide is Yum Buns who have a stall in Broadway Market Schoolyard and whose steamed pork buns are attracting foodies from far and wide to E8.

Click image to go to story

Click image to go to story

The venerated National Geographic has a feature on East London in this months issue. This caption appeared beneath a photo of some trendies on Broadway Market “On Saturdays, East London’s newest arrivals—the young and affluent—linger in trendy cafés and trawl the stalls of Broadway Market. Formerly a locus of garden-variety fruit and veg stands, the market now offers eco-friendly bamboo socks, loin of venison, and hand-sliced smoked salmon.” Click image to go to gallery.

Trendies on Broadway Market

Trendies on Broadway Market

The Evening Standard reports that the majority of the capital’s population now lives east of Blackfriars Bridge. This remarkable demographic shift to just beyond the Square Mile’s ancient walls is largely due to new transport links — the Jubilee line and the East London line extensions among them — that have combined with riverbank regeneration to revitalise City fringe districts, now bursting with dot.commerce businesses and new cultural and leisure attractions.

Truman Brewery Brick Lane

Truman Brewery Brick Lane

The Econmist this week has a special report on London. This is London’s year. London has resisted Britain’s relative decline. Globalisation is distilled and concentrated in London, making it the world’s most international city. New York has as many foreign-born people as London—a bit more than a third—but its businesses look to America, whereas London’s look out to the world. Read more here or watch the video.

Fascinating stuff.

The London Evening Standard reports from the fringes of the park-cum-outdoor catwalk that is London Fields. Unfortunately nobody from Team Findlay caught the photographers eye.

Click image below to go to gallery:

Click to go to gallery

Click to go to gallery